Time to rebuild a jetty at Cleveland

Of all the jetties in the Redlands, this one was the most well-known. It was built on Cleveland Point in 1887 by the Queensland Government to replace the 1866 jetty. Photos of this jetty were used for postcards like this one. This photo was taken about 1914. Photos courtesy of Redland City Council Local History and Heritage Library.
Of all the jetties in the Redlands, this one was the most well-known. It was built on Cleveland Point in 1887 by the Queensland Government to replace the 1866 jetty. Photos of this jetty were used for postcards like this one. This photo was taken about 1914. Photos courtesy of Redland City Council Local History and Heritage Library.
These are some of the jetties that used to line Cleveland Point. These jetties had bathing enclosures and small changing sheds on the end. This photo was taken about 1940.  Photos courtesy of Redland City Council Local History and Heritage Library

These are some of the jetties that used to line Cleveland Point. These jetties had bathing enclosures and small changing sheds on the end. This photo was taken about 1940. Photos courtesy of Redland City Council Local History and Heritage Library

The Redland Bay Hotel and the jetty below it in the early 1920s. This jetty was the main one used by farmers from 1898 to 1909. The two tracks on the jetty were for a trolley that carried the fruit and vegetables to the boats. The boats took the produce to market in Brisbane.

The Redland Bay Hotel and the jetty below it in the early 1920s. This jetty was the main one used by farmers from 1898 to 1909. The two tracks on the jetty were for a trolley that carried the fruit and vegetables to the boats. The boats took the produce to market in Brisbane.

 This private jetty was in Tingalpa Creek. This photo was taken in the 1950s. Not all jetties ran into the sea. Manywere in creeks or on lakes.

This private jetty was in Tingalpa Creek. This photo was taken in the 1950s. Not all jetties ran into the sea. Manywere in creeks or on lakes.

This was Cleveland’s first public jetty, built in 1866. The shed was for sheltering people and goods. The photo was taken about 1871

This was Cleveland’s first public jetty, built in 1866. The shed was for sheltering people and goods. The photo was taken about 1871

Another view of Cleveland’s first public jetty taken in a later period.

Another view of Cleveland’s first public jetty taken in a later period.

A little jetty was in Redland Bay. It was for the owner’s boat, and for children who fished and swam off it. Note how narrow and low it is compared with the bigger public jetties. There were many jetties like this one in the Redlands. The photo was taken in about 1959.

A little jetty was in Redland Bay. It was for the owner’s boat, and for children who fished and swam off it. Note how narrow and low it is compared with the bigger public jetties. There were many jetties like this one in the Redlands. The photo was taken in about 1959.

Shows people at the bathing enclosure on the Oyster Point Jetty in 1940. This jetty was built in the 1920s off Oyster Point in Cleveland. Students from Cleveland State School used to swim there

Shows people at the bathing enclosure on the Oyster Point Jetty in 1940. This jetty was built in the 1920s off Oyster Point in Cleveland. Students from Cleveland State School used to swim there

The Cleveland jetty in a photo taken about 1930. Note the bathing enclosure half way along the jetty.

The Cleveland jetty in a photo taken about 1930. Note the bathing enclosure half way along the jetty.

Two of Victoria Point’s jetties. Note the tents on the Point: many people camped at Victoria Point at this time.

Two of Victoria Point’s jetties. Note the tents on the Point: many people camped at Victoria Point at this time.

The Paxton Street jetty can just be seen on the right of this photo. It was very popular with locals who fished off the end.

The Paxton Street jetty can just be seen on the right of this photo. It was very popular with locals who fished off the end.

The Wellington Point jetty was first built about 1937 in the same place as the present jetty. It has been renovated and repaired since then. It was mainly used by visitors to Wellington Point, which was a popular camping spot especially during school holidays.

The Wellington Point jetty was first built about 1937 in the same place as the present jetty. It has been renovated and repaired since then. It was mainly used by visitors to Wellington Point, which was a popular camping spot especially during school holidays.

The Wellington Point jetty today.

The Wellington Point jetty today.

The revamped Woody Point jetty in the Redcliffe area. Could we build a jetty like this this at Cleveland?

The revamped Woody Point jetty in the Redcliffe area. Could we build a jetty like this this at Cleveland?

Another view of the revamped Woody Point jetty

Another view of the revamped Woody Point jetty

In the very early settlement of the Redlands, jetties were dotted along the foreshore. They were prominent in the early 1900s and were still being built right up to the 1950s.  

Many were small private jetties used by property owners while others were major structure used both for local boat traffic. Some, such as the Cleveland Point jetty were major tourist attractions

The jetties of early days emerged because from the very early days, farmers and pastoralists used the Bay as a means of transport between settlements and the jetties provided the access.

Sadly, Cleveland doesn’t have any major or public jetties these days. Their commercial use diminished and they fell into disrepair and the jetties either fell down or were demolished because governments didn’t want to maintain them.

The last major Cleveland jetty in Paxton Street, near the Old Courthouse was demolished in 1991.

We still have a jetty at Wellington Point which is purely for recreation, and the Victoria Point jetty provides the access to Coochiemudlo Island.

So why not a jetty at Cleveland? It would be purely for recreational purposes, but it would help Cleveland retain of its links with its early transport heritage. 

On the other side of the bay, Redcliffe has retained it major jetty, and enhanced it tourism offerings through it. The Woody Point jetty was also rebuilt a few years ago and is popular with visitors and locals.

If we want a jetty for Cleveland, we need to work out where to put, and who is going to pay for it and then maintain it. It could be a joint State and local government project with private sector involvement. The options should be explored.

Let us know what you think?  Add your comments in the Comments section below. Or email your views and photos you have of jetties to newsredland@fairfaxmedia.com.au