'Mistake' in Toondah draft map says council officer

Redland City Council officer Scott Hutchison explains a mistake showing 15-storey buildings in a dog park on maps of the proposed Toondah Harbour development site. Mr Hutchison said the 15-storey buildings should be located closer to the ferry terminal than is indicated on the map. PHOTO: Judith Kerr
Redland City Council officer Scott Hutchison explains a mistake showing 15-storey buildings in a dog park on maps of the proposed Toondah Harbour development site. Mr Hutchison said the 15-storey buildings should be located closer to the ferry terminal than is indicated on the map. PHOTO: Judith Kerr
Redland City Council officer Scott Hutchison tells the crowd proposals for the Toondah Harbour precinct are not a "done deal".

Redland City Council officer Scott Hutchison tells the crowd proposals for the Toondah Harbour precinct are not a "done deal".

PENNY ALLMAN-PAYNE: Teacher, lawyer, Greens candidate, Cleveland: "We've read the document and we don't like it. We want our elected representatives to represent our wishes. What is the mechanism for getting this changed? We have been led to believe it is a done deal."

PENNY ALLMAN-PAYNE: Teacher, lawyer, Greens candidate, Cleveland: "We've read the document and we don't like it. We want our elected representatives to represent our wishes. What is the mechanism for getting this changed? We have been led to believe it is a done deal."

REBECCA WEHR, 38, Ormiston, yoga teacher: "There are few here who object to upgrading the ferry terminal but we all object to the future development and destruction of the GJ Walter dog park.

REBECCA WEHR, 38, Ormiston, yoga teacher: "There are few here who object to upgrading the ferry terminal but we all object to the future development and destruction of the GJ Walter dog park.

LAVINIA WOOD: 61, Thornlands, environmental activist: "This is nothing more than an agreed land grab which deliberately ignores all of the community's wishes."

LAVINIA WOOD: 61, Thornlands, environmental activist: "This is nothing more than an agreed land grab which deliberately ignores all of the community's wishes."

A REDLAND City council officer has admitted making a mistake in draft maps for the redevelopment of Toondah Harbour.

NICK PERKINS, Cleveland, 34, IT: "We saw how the state listened to residents with the outcome of the Barro quarry and the state will do the same here. We know what will happen, all the feedback will be sent back to the state and Jeff Seeney is going to say 'get stuffed, you're going to have your marina and have your 15 storeys'."

NICK PERKINS, Cleveland, 34, IT: "We saw how the state listened to residents with the outcome of the Barro quarry and the state will do the same here. We know what will happen, all the feedback will be sent back to the state and Jeff Seeney is going to say 'get stuffed, you're going to have your marina and have your 15 storeys'."

WAYNE LAMB, 47, property developer, Raby Bay: "We need to get the best planning scheme possible because to stand here and say we're going to stop this happening is a bit naive. Let's ask and demand to stay involved during the process. You can design these projects so there are a whole lot of outcomes for everyone - like at Brisbane's Portside, which I was involved in."

WAYNE LAMB, 47, property developer, Raby Bay: "We need to get the best planning scheme possible because to stand here and say we're going to stop this happening is a bit naive. Let's ask and demand to stay involved during the process. You can design these projects so there are a whole lot of outcomes for everyone - like at Brisbane's Portside, which I was involved in."

TERENCE HENDRICKS: Cleveland sales, 66: "Who decided there should be 15 storeys in the plan when the council only stipulates a maximum of seven storeys at the moment? It looks like a joint decision between the council and the state against their own planning policy."

TERENCE HENDRICKS: Cleveland sales, 66: "Who decided there should be 15 storeys in the plan when the council only stipulates a maximum of seven storeys at the moment? It looks like a joint decision between the council and the state against their own planning policy."

Principal Adviser Priority Development Areas Scott Hutchison made the claim at a council-driven information session on rejuvenating Toondah Harbour on Saturday.

JEANNETTE DOUGLASS, 66, Cleveland, retired maths teacher: "Council is completely ignoring the marine park zoning in this plan. It expects the public to abide by the laws but then puts that up as an option to entice a developer. I'm also concerned about traffic and parking problems caused by 15-storey residential buildings."

JEANNETTE DOUGLASS, 66, Cleveland, retired maths teacher: "Council is completely ignoring the marine park zoning in this plan. It expects the public to abide by the laws but then puts that up as an option to entice a developer. I'm also concerned about traffic and parking problems caused by 15-storey residential buildings."

CHRIS AYRES, 66, Wellington Point, retired solicitor: "I think an 800-berth marina is unviable because there are already a large number of unsold marina berths at Wynnum selling for half the price they were bought at. It is also too shallow and there would be conflicts between ferries and recreational boats."

CHRIS AYRES, 66, Wellington Point, retired solicitor: "I think an 800-berth marina is unviable because there are already a large number of unsold marina berths at Wynnum selling for half the price they were bought at. It is also too shallow and there would be conflicts between ferries and recreational boats."

MARIE STEELE, 60, Cleveland, retired: "Most have no problem with developing the area  but the proposal seems to be excessive, in particular, the 15-storey foreshore apartments in GJ Walter Park. We all agree the harbour needs a tidy-up and we would love a board walk but not this."

MARIE STEELE, 60, Cleveland, retired: "Most have no problem with developing the area but the proposal seems to be excessive, in particular, the 15-storey foreshore apartments in GJ Walter Park. We all agree the harbour needs a tidy-up and we would love a board walk but not this."

SID STEELE, 67, Cleveland, retired chairman of Star of the Sea parish: "I am concerned about the impact on Queen Street and the school areas and about the parish's riparian rights."

SID STEELE, 67, Cleveland, retired chairman of Star of the Sea parish: "I am concerned about the impact on Queen Street and the school areas and about the parish's riparian rights."

People check out the plans for redeveloping Toondah Harbour at Island View Cafe on Saturday.

People check out the plans for redeveloping Toondah Harbour at Island View Cafe on Saturday.

Jayne Milward, 66, Cleveland, retired teacher: "The council officer has now acknowledged that the 15-storey apartments are incorrect on the map. The council is trying to tell residents that 15 storeys are compatible with what is there at the moment. But there is only a park there at the moment."

Jayne Milward, 66, Cleveland, retired teacher: "The council officer has now acknowledged that the 15-storey apartments are incorrect on the map. The council is trying to tell residents that 15 storeys are compatible with what is there at the moment. But there is only a park there at the moment."

CLEVELAND MP Mark Robinson said he had listened to all views and would "take on" as many local concerns.

CLEVELAND MP Mark Robinson said he had listened to all views and would "take on" as many local concerns.

He told a group of about 100 Cleveland residents a council draft map incorrectly showed the location for 15-storey residential towers in a dog park adjacent to GJ Walter Park.

“The dog park is seen in several areas as being protected and another map shows 15 storeys on the dog park,” Mr Hutchison said.

“Clearly they're inconsistent and a mistake on my part. It was not intended.”

Mr Hutchison said the map should show the 15-storey buildings further south away from the dog park and closer to the ferry terminal.

At the meeting, residents said they were unhappy the plan would allow development of buildings up to 15 storeys, a large 800-berth marina and a road next to a recognised koala corridor.

Cleveland teacher and Greens Party member Penny Allman-Payne told Mr Hutchison residents were annoyed the proposed plan disregarded community feedback given during the first consultation phase in August last year.

“At those consultations, residents clearly opposed any high-rise development in this area,” Ms Allman-Payne said.

“Most people here agree the harbour needs improvements but think it should be done on a much smaller scale than the current proposal.

“We want to make sure this is not a done deal. It is time for elected representatives to do some very careful listening to local residents.”

Mr Hutchison denied the proposal was a “done deal” and said it was in the early stages of a development scheme, which would later be put out for expressions of interest before development applications were lodged for council approval.

As part of the council marketing campaign to attract developers to the precinct, residents at Saturday's meeting were given a 3D glimpse of what the Cleveland ferry terminal might look like after redevelopment.

Council used state-of-the-art 3D phone apps and a computer-generated panoramic program to help people visualise the precinct, which includes bus terminal, cafes and residential apartment blocks.

Officers took the crowd from the Island View Cafe about 1km to the dog offleash park, where ipads loaded with the panoramic program were difficult to view in the sun.

They were also able to download free “Toondah Harbour” or “Weinam Creek” apps for their phones and then hold the phone in front of a special 3D map, which brings to life 3D buildings on the site.

The map will be reproduced in Tuesday's Bayside Bulletin for those who missed out.

It was the first information session for Toondah and followed a community forum, attended by 100, at Redland Bay on Weinam Creek on Thursday.

Council staff, including General Manager Organisational Services Nick Clarke, and project director Peter Kelley were on hand to answer questions at both sessions.

Redlands MP Peter Dowling explained some of the flaws in the Weinam Creek proposal and Cleveland MP Mark Robinson spoke about the plans to make Toondah a world-class facility.

Mr Dowling said he had “concerns” about the Weinam Creek draft plan, including the timing of the ferry terminal relocation, a planned road and lack of open space on the foreshore.

“The ferry terminal and a linked car park must be done before the foreshore is developed,” he said.

Most people at both sessions wanted to know when construction would start, what parking arrangements would be for island residents and how much open space would be included.

Others suggested water parks and areas for families to picnic.

Mr Clarke said the state would consider all feedback after the submission period for both developments closed on February 24.

He said any adjustments would be handed to council by the end of March with the state signing off on the new documents by the end of April.

Expressions of interest for both ferry terminals are expected to be called in late May before any investor can lodge a development application with the council.

The next public information session for Weinam Creek will be at Macleay Island Progress Hall, Macleay Island, on Thursday, February 6 from 5 to 8pm.

The next meetings on Toondah Harbour are at the Island View Café, Toondah Harbour, on Friday, February 7 from 3.30pm to 5.30pm and Saturday February 8, from 1pm-3pm at the Dunwich Community Hall, Dunwich, North Stradbroke Island.