Election casts doubt over $1b Toondah project

THE future of the billion-dollar Toondah Harbour project was hanging in the balance yesterday as counting continued to decide the next state government.

At the time of going to press, a hung parliament was likely, with ALP and LNP expecting 43 seats each and the Katter Party and Independent Peter Wellington holding the balance.

Claims over counting in the seat of Mount Coot-tha were also casting doubts over the final result.

The close tally left question marks over a raft of election promises for Redland City's three state electorates.

School shade sails, a football club kitchen, right-hand turning lanes, an artificial reef, traffic lights, road upgrades and overhauling the city's two ferry terminals were all promises made under the Newman government.

Question marks also hung over the end date for sandmining on North Stradbroke Island after the ALP on Friday vowed to repeal LNP amendments to the North Stradbroke Island Protection and Sustainability Act.

Cleveland MP Mark Robinson, returned for a third term, said the Toondah Harbour ferry terminal overhaul depended on how far plans had progressed before the previous government went into caretaker mode.

He said the Labor Party had not released plans for the site.

"I hope plans have progressed far enough that there is already a direction but I can't speak for another government," he said.

In September, global giant Walker Corporation signed a preliminary deal with the state and council to develop the Cleveland terminal.

Even Redland mayor Karen Williams was uncertain about the way forward for the projects' future.

She will speak with the incoming Minister for Planning and Infrastructure about the importance of the two projects, which she said were critical infrastructure and would create jobs.

The ALP also vowed, if elected, to repeal amendments to the North Stradbroke Island Protection and Sustainability Act, effectively ending sandmining by 2019.

Mr Robinson claimed winning three booths on the island on primary votes was proof the Newman government's mining plan to extend leases until 2035 was popular.

In Capalaba, the future of two blocks of federal land was another issue the electorate's new member Don Brown will broach when he meets Cr Williams officially for the first time.

Union stalwart Don Brown will replace the LNP's Steve Davies in the seat of Capalaba.

Union stalwart Don Brown will replace the LNP's Steve Davies in the seat of Capalaba.

Mr Brown said residents did not want the site developed or the bushland sold and would work to defend the green space.

He said he hoped to work closely with the mayor and Bowman MP Andrew Laming despite a Facebook post claiming he would criticise Mr Laming in his maiden speech to parliament.

"I haven't written the speech yet but I think I might have to thank him (Laming) instead because I think he was worth one or two per cent," he joked.

"Whether we are in government or not, my three priorities are to create jobs, fix our TAFE and ensure the right balance is struck for the Birkdale bushland."

Redland council said it would bid for the land.

In Redlands, the LNP's Matt McEachan said his first priority would be to push for all the election promises he made.

Redlands MP-elect Matt McEachan will push to get his election commitments met.

Redlands MP-elect Matt McEachan will push to get his election commitments met.

They include dual lanes for Cleveland-Redland Bay Road, $2 million traffic lights at Anita Street, a $75,000 kitchen for the Redland Junior Rugby League and $85,000 shade sails for Redland Bay State School.

"Regardless of the political outcome, we have to get that road infrastructure," Mr McEachan said.

He said if former Infrastructure and Planning Minister Stirling Hinchliffe returned to his ministerial position, he would raise the issue of instating parts of Thornlands and Redland Bay in the urban footprint.

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