White pollution contaminates waters at Holland Crescent Reserve

DAILY STROLL: Milton Ludlow, of Capalaba, in front of the watercourse he saw was polluted on Wednesday.
DAILY STROLL: Milton Ludlow, of Capalaba, in front of the watercourse he saw was polluted on Wednesday.

AN URBAN waterway at Capalaba was left polluted after an unknown white pollutant passed into the catchment through stormwater drainage.

Capalaba man Milton Ludlow noticed the substance last Wednesday, January 8, on his daily walk past the creek at Holland Crescent Reserve near Tauris Road.

While it was the first time he had seen the waters polluted, Mr Ludlow said the unknown substance may have been an industrial degreaser leaked from the nearby commercial area. 

“There was a trail from the outlet to the creek,” Mr Ludlow said. Mr Ludlow photographed the contaminated waters.

“There was a trail from the outlet to the creek,” Mr Ludlow said. Mr Ludlow photographed the contaminated waters.

“There was a trail from the outlet to the creek,” he said.

Mr Ludlow said he also spotted dead tadpoles and other small aquatic life floating dead on the water’s surface at the time.

Mr Ludlow approached the Redland City Council the following day to report the incident.  

While a site inspection took place within half-an-hour of Mr Ludlow’s report, a council spokesman said no water quality testing was undertaken as the substance had been flushed away.

Rain had fallen on the Wednesday night.

“The waterway was flowing clearly and in the absence of identifiable pollutants, the council is unable to take samples for testing,” the council spokesman said.

“However, officers are continuing investigations to see if there are any identifiable pollution sources from the surrounding area.”

POLLUTED: The contaminated water flowing from stormwater drains into the catchment. Photo: Milton Ludlow.

POLLUTED: The contaminated water flowing from stormwater drains into the catchment. Photo: Milton Ludlow.

The council spokesman said the Holland Crescent Reserve urban waterway was connected to the Tingalpa and Coolwympin Creeks through stormwater systems, with the area recognised for its wetland and fish breeding environments.

“Deliberate or accidental pollution can have serious flow-on effects,” the spokesman said.

“Our city waterways are a vital and interconnected part of our city’s ecology and natural environment, including Moreton Bay.

The catchment at Holland Crescent Reserve is frequented by wildlife including ducks. Photo: Milton Ludlow

The catchment at Holland Crescent Reserve is frequented by wildlife including ducks. Photo: Milton Ludlow

To report water pollution, phone the Redland City Council on 3829 8999.