Greeno’s Cultural Jewels captured from nature

NATURE'S BEAUTY: Lola Greeno, Warrener necklace 2014, is part of the Cultural Jewels exhibition. Picture: John Lemming and courtesy of the artist.

NATURE'S BEAUTY: Lola Greeno, Warrener necklace 2014, is part of the Cultural Jewels exhibition. Picture: John Lemming and courtesy of the artist.

The solo exhibition of internationally respected Tasmanian indigenous artist Lola Greeno is on its way to Redland Art Gallery (RAG), Cleveland. RAG is one of only two Queensland host venues in the 16 venue national tour that started in Tasmania in 2014. Presented by Object: Australian Design Centre, Lola Greeno’s award winning talent in shell-working is magnificently displayed in the exhibition’s 50 highly visual and textural works, each uniquely championing the traditions and culture of the Indigenous women of Tasmania’s Cape Barren and Flinders Islands.

The overarching theme of Lola Greeno: Cultural Jewels is storytelling; of the meticulous crafting of stories of cultural knowledge, natural beauty, ancient traditions, and connectedness with her island home. It is also an exhibition of modern issues – contemporary sculptural works feature that are part of Greeno’s response to her concerns for the environmental future of shell stringing in northern Tasmania.

Lola Greeno: Cultural Jewels features breath-taking works using unusual and beautiful natural materials such as Echidna quill, feather, rare Maireener shell and bone, set in a ground-breaking contemporary installation designed by Project Two, with interwoven digital and audio displays.

The official opening is at 6.30pm Friday  March 24 at Redland Art Gallery, Cleveland. Exhibition to be opened by Lisa Cahill, director, Australian Design Centre. Refreshments provided.

A floor talk and morning tea will be held at 10.30am on Sunday March 26. Join us for morning tea and hear from Diane Moon, curator, Indigenous Fibre Art, QAGOMA. These are free events, all welcome. Exhibition continues until Sunday May 7.

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