Early help can have huge impact

VITAL SUPPORT: AEIOU Foundation provides early intervention improves outcomes for children with autism and their families.

VITAL SUPPORT: AEIOU Foundation provides early intervention improves outcomes for children with autism and their families.

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Autism Awareness Month

Getting help early can have a huge impact on the lives of children with autism.

Research shows early intervention makes a big difference to a child’s development leading to improved outcomes, including higher intelligence, and increased social and daily living skills.

Leading autism early intervention provider, AEIOU Foundation, is creating a lifetime of opportunities for children with autism and their families.

Established in 2005, AEIOU Foundation is a not-for-profit organisation which delivers high-quality therapy with a program that meets national guidelines.

“At AEIOU, we work with each child as an individual, identifying their strengths and needs and supporting them to reach their goals,” AEIOU CEO Alan Smith said.

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“A big focus is developing essential independence and communication skills, while reducing challenging behaviours to improve long-term social and educational outcomes.”

The foundation has nine centres in Queensland and one in South Australia with another centre set to open in Logan in 2018. 

The $1 million purpose-built facility will enable the foundation to provide 40 families with the early intervention service. 

“We are proud of the program we deliver,” Mr Smith said. 

“Each child receives a minimum of 20 hours of early intervention therapy per week, delivered by an experienced transdisciplinary team of behaviour analysts, speech pathologists, occupational therapists, educators and skilled facilitators.

A big focus for us is developing essential independence and communication skills, while reducing challenging behaviours. - AEIOU CEO Alan Smith

“In addition, we provide regular training and support to parents and carers, along with tools to achieve therapy goals in the home.”

Autism is not rare, it affects one in 100 people in Australia. 

A recent report estimated that autism costs Australia $8 billion a year in healthcare, social services and education costs, employment and informal care costs and burden of disease costs.

It also estimates that spending $118 million a year on early intervention for 1200 pre-school children with autism could result in a economic benefit of around $1.22 billion a year.

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