Bowman MP Andrew Laming aims to allay NBN concerns

NBN: MP Andrew Laming gestures towards pre-existing pay-television cables being used to deliver the NBN to most of Capalaba. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

NBN: MP Andrew Laming gestures towards pre-existing pay-television cables being used to deliver the NBN to most of Capalaba. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

BOWMAN MP Andrew Laming has moved to address residents’ fears about the national broadband network, following concerns raised by the owner of units for seniors at Capalaba.

Russell Walker told Redland City Bulletin earlier this month tenants were distressed after receiving a letter from NBN Co that landline phones and internet networks would be disconnected as NBN was available.

Mr Laming said residents had an 18-month window to connect to the NBN from the time it was available in their area.

“The NBN is a major upgrade to Australia’s fixed-line telecommunications infrastructure and will require every premises in the country to transition onto the network,” he said.

“At the moment that affects three out of 12 suburbs in the Redlands.”

The suburbs are Redland Bay, Mount Cotton and residential parts of Capalaba.

Fast facts

  • Residents can keep their phone number if they connect to the NBN within 18 months of their suburb becoming ready for NBN service.
  • Suburbs in Redlands that have NBN are Redland Bay, Mount Cotton and parts of Capalaba.
  • Phone services using the NBN should not cost more than on the old network.
  • Residents should assume they would have no working phone during a power outage once they switched to the NBN.
  • Residents do not deal with NBN Co directly. Services are provided through phone and internet providers.

Mr Laming urged residents living in suburbs where NBN had already been rolled out to contact their phone and internet provider within 18 months from when their area was ready for service.

He said switching over within the time period would enable residents to keep their telephone number.

“If they do nothing, they will lose their number,” he said.

Mr Laming said that in southern Redlands, where the NBN would reuse the copper phone cables to connect, residents should ask their phone provider for an NBN-compliant modem.

He said this would be sent in the mail and should be plugged directly into the phone point.

Mr Laming said in Capalaba, where pre-existing pay-television cables were being used, an NBN technician would install an NBN box at each premises.

“A new modem is also required from the phone company,” he said.

This would be sent in the post.

Capalaba resident Eunice McRae told the Bulletin she was advised she would have to pay $60 a month using NBN, while her landline currently cost $29.

However, Mr Laming said residents could have a home phone service on the NBN at the same price as on the old telephone network.

He said a basic Telstra plan worked on the NBN and currently cost $27.95 a month and pension concession cardholders could order an essential plan from $25 per month.

​Mr Laming said residents should assume they would have no working phone during a power outage once they switched to the NBN.

“That is a feature of digital phone systems worldwide,” he said.

He said people could have a cheap mobile phone as a back-up or use an emergency alert necklace or bracelet if they were worried about their health.

“You don’t need a working phone line or power for (alerts) to work, depending on the technology you have,” he said.

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