Drive-by voting at Cleveland is a first for Queensland and a winner

DRIVE-BY voting was going famously in the seat of Oodgeroo today, with it and Noosa the first electorates in Queensland to test such polling booths.

OODGEROO VOTING: Drive-by voting at Cleveland Baptist Church, the first in the state. It worked a treat, say booth workers.

OODGEROO VOTING: Drive-by voting at Cleveland Baptist Church, the first in the state. It worked a treat, say booth workers.

Labor and LNP booth workers Janice Harrison and Andrew Cast said the system at the Cleveland Baptist Church on Bloomfield Street had worked smoothly all day.

Mr Cast said it was surprising how well it had gone, with Friday busier than today.

“We were pretty busy yesterday,” he said. “We’ve had a lot of people with young kids in cars and people with work clothes on.

“There has been a bit of a line up at times but people have been good. They’ve had to wait maybe only a minute.”

Drivers pull up to a Queensland Electoral Commission officer who checks if they need how-to-vote material which is then handed out by booth workers.

They then motor forwards to electoral staff who check ID and scan electoral information and mark those taking part off the roll, just as occurs in a normal polling booth.

Occupants receive a voting slip, fill it out in the car and then place it in a QEC portable ballot box held by an official.

HAPPY WORKERS: Labor and LNP booth workers Janice Harrison and Andrew Cast said the system at the Cleveland Baptist Church on Bloomfield Street had worked smoothly all day.

HAPPY WORKERS: Labor and LNP booth workers Janice Harrison and Andrew Cast said the system at the Cleveland Baptist Church on Bloomfield Street had worked smoothly all day.

The only issue for Ms Harrison and Mr Cast was each had hoped they would be replaced with other booth workers to ease the load.

“I thought that I would be here only until lunch time,” Ms Harrison said.

Other than that, they system had been flawless, Mr Cast said.

The QEC is trialling the booths to make voting easier for the mobility impaired.

Assistant electoral commissioner Dermot Tiernan said the commission had also produced a Queensland voting guide in the 27 most commonly spoken languages.

There were 3.17 million Queenslanders on the electoral roll.