No presence of Zika carrying mosquitoes in Redlands

NO SIGN: Number of non-Zika mosquito eggs in collection strips. Photo: Queensland Heath / Google Maps 2017
NO SIGN: Number of non-Zika mosquito eggs in collection strips. Photo: Queensland Heath / Google Maps 2017

TWO species of exotic mosquitoes found at Lytton last week have not made their way into the Redlands.

Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti were found at the Port of Brisbane in mosquito traps last week, triggering authorities to spray in and around the area to exterminate the pest.

A Queensland Health spokesman said no more than one specimen of each mosquito and some larvae were found, with the species unlikely to reach past the containment area.

“It is just a routine thing,” he said.

“They suspect they came in on imported goods.”

The two tropical mosquitoes, which can carry diseases including dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus, are prevalent in tropical areas, including northern Queensland.

While the Aedes albopictus, found in the Torres Strait, has been kept from mainland Australia, the Aedes aegypti have been found as far south as Wondai.

The presence of the Aedes aegypti mosquito is monitored in the Redlands through Metro South Health’s Zika Mozzie Seeker program and Redland City Council’s own surveillance.

A Redland City Council spokesperson said traps had been set across the Redlands by council for mosquito monitoring.

“Aedes Albopictus and Aedes aegypti have not been found within Redland City area to date,” the spokesperson said.

“Redland City is a very low risk port of entry for these exotic mosquitoes, however council maintains open lines of communications with surrounding local and state government authorities and is notified on detection of these exotic incursions.”

No Aedes aegypti eggs were trapped in the Zika Mozzie Seekers’ collection efforts between October and December last year. 

To help trap mosquito eggs as part of the Zika Mozzie Seekers program’s next round this year, visit here.