Redland group wins waterway awards

Peel Island is one of the sites the group uses to keep tabs on seagrass.
Peel Island is one of the sites the group uses to keep tabs on seagrass.
Wildlife Queensland Bayside Branch volunteers monitor mangroves off Redland.

Wildlife Queensland Bayside Branch volunteers monitor mangroves off Redland.

Wildlife Queensland Bayside branch volunteers tidy up mangroves in Redlands.

Wildlife Queensland Bayside branch volunteers tidy up mangroves in Redlands.

Redland students get involved in Wildlife Queensland Bayside branch's Cicada program, filming the environment.

Redland students get involved in Wildlife Queensland Bayside branch's Cicada program, filming the environment.

Birds benefir form clean waterways.

Birds benefir form clean waterways.

Wildlife Bayside branch members monitor seagrass in Moreton Bay.

Wildlife Bayside branch members monitor seagrass in Moreton Bay.

Wildlife Queensland Bayside branch members at the awards (from left) Michael Lusis, Belinda Homewood, Steve Homewood, Maureen Tottenham, Doreen Payne, Alex Baltais and Emma Watson.

Wildlife Queensland Bayside branch members at the awards (from left) Michael Lusis, Belinda Homewood, Steve Homewood, Maureen Tottenham, Doreen Payne, Alex Baltais and Emma Watson.

Redland students get involved in Wildlife Queensland Bayside branch's Cicada program, filming the environment.

Redland students get involved in Wildlife Queensland Bayside branch's Cicada program, filming the environment.

A REDLAND community project which encouraged school students to make short films about protecting the environment won the highest honour at last week's Healthy Waterway Awards.

Wildlife Queensland Bayside branch's Community Action Research project won the 2012 Minister's Grand Prize after an independent judging panel voted it the most innovative entry.

Along with the grand prize of $10,000, the project also won the $1500 Brisbane Airport Community Award.

The community project delivered 10 programs during the year including the popular Cicada Film and Animation awards, run at 14 primary and high schools in Redlands for the first time last year.

It also coordinated projects to monitor the Ornate Sunfish population, seagrass and mangroves in Moreton Bay, and held Science at the Pub lectures at the Grand View Hotel in Cleveland.

Wildlife Queensland Research Group chairman Michael Lusis said he was delighted with the two prizes and money.

"We won the community section of the awards one of the award's eight categories - but it was wonderful to then win the overall prize," Mr Lusis said.

"Judges liked our innovative project for getting the kids involved with film.

"Now we have this money, we are looking to the future and, hopefully, some more innovative projects," he said.

Mr Lusis said the success of the group, based out of Waterloo Bay, Cleveland, was due to its volunteers, funds from government and industry, and technical support from non-government organisations.

Brisbane Airport Corporation's environment manager Helen Clarke said waterways were an integral part of sustaining South East Queensland and promised ongoing funding for the awards.

The awards have been held for 12 years and recognise outstanding work of groups and individuals to improve local the waterways and catchments.

Environment Minister Andrew Powell also congratulated Wildlife Queensland Baysidebranch for its contribution to protecting the bay and waterways.