Museum shows rich history of printing

 In the late 1800s and early 1900s apart from the street walk chats, newspapers were the only source of “reliable” news. To produce papers in those days required a considerable amount of manual labour. The whole process needed substantial skill and was a worthwhile trade for many young men.

PRINTING HISTORY: In the Redland Museum’s printing shop you will see the Platen type manual proof and poster press manufactured about 1888 and the “Gem” made by T.C. Thompson & Sons in Manchester England about 1890.

PRINTING HISTORY: In the Redland Museum’s printing shop you will see the Platen type manual proof and poster press manufactured about 1888 and the “Gem” made by T.C. Thompson & Sons in Manchester England about 1890.

One such man was William Thorne who emigrated from England in 1863 aged of 23. He established a successful printing business in Brisbane in 1874 and became prominent in local affairs. William Thorne was an Alderman for many years and Mayor of Brisbane in 1898.

His connection with the Redlands began when he purchased a large area of land we now know as Birkdale and Thorneside. He named the land Birkdale after his home in Devonshire, England.

Using his influence he pushed for the area to become a separate division. On the 30 May 1885 the Cleveland Division was established. This area became the Shire of Redland on the 30 March 1903.

In the Redland Museum’s printing shop you will get to see some of the printing presses involved in those early processes. There is the Platen type manual proof and poster press manufactured around 1888. You can also see (in operation) the “Gem” made by T.C. Thompson & Sons in Manchester England around 1890. This printing press was used for over 25 years in the Redlands.

The printing press area now benefits from another Christian Griffiths mural. This has added another very attractive feature in the museum.

Visit the museum at 60 Smith Street, Cleveland or online at www.redlandmuseum.org.au. Ph 07 3286 3494