A crack down looms on roaming dogs on North Stradbroke Island

DEADLY TOLL: Head community ranger Darren Burns with Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation principal ranger Dave Nalder and the two koalas.

DEADLY TOLL: Head community ranger Darren Burns with Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation principal ranger Dave Nalder and the two koalas.

NORTH Stradbroke Island head ranger Darren Burns is calling for the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service and Redland City Council to crack down on people who let their dogs roam after a further two koalas were killed.

Two koalas – a male and a female – were found dead Thursday morning after being attacked and killed by domestic dogs.

“They were found five metres apart and were obviously together at the time of the attack,’’ Mr Burns said.

“We have seen too many koala deaths by dogs and this attack in the spring breeding season is unimaginably tragic and significant for the island’s koala future

“We cannot allow these attacks to continue (and) have resolved with our partners the RCC and QPWS to have a gloves-off approach to unlawful dog control on NSI.’’

In August, council moved to cut the damage from suburban dogs on koalas, expanding the area in which people will have to lock up or tether their animals at night.

A total of 447 homes will be impacted in parts of North Stradbroke Island, Thorneside and Thornlands, St James Park and Ferntree Park.

Councillors backed the changes but votes were split after a passionate debate.

A St James Park Neighbourhood Watch representative said fencing would be an impost on large blocks and people also were concerned that if dogs were restrained, it would increase the potential for crime.

Koala Action Group spokeswoman Debbie Pointing said the Redlands had lost more than 600 koalas to dog attacks and most of these were preventable.