Man monitored for toxins after early morning snake bite

SNAKE BITE: It is not understood what species of snake the man was bitten by. Pictured is a yellow-faced whip snake. Photo: Lauren Amy Rose
SNAKE BITE: It is not understood what species of snake the man was bitten by. Pictured is a yellow-faced whip snake. Photo: Lauren Amy Rose

A 29-YEAR-OLD man who told paramedics he was bitten by a snake on the ankle is being watched at Redland Hospital for signs of poisoning.

He was admitted in a stable condition after paramedics were called to his Cleveland home about 1.45am on Wednesday.

A hospital spokeswoman said the man would be monitored until staff were sure the bite was not venomous, which would likely be sometime on Wednesday afternoon.

It is not understood whether the reptile was wild or a pet, or what prompted the snake to strike, but Redlands snake catcher Tony Morrison has offered his thoughts on what people need to do if bitten.

Mr Morrison said bites should not be wiped or washed.

“As soon as you are sent to the hospital they will swab you with a kit that detects the type of venom,” he said.

“If they don’t know, they don’t know what antivenom to give.”

Wrapping bandage down from above the bite, as tightly as one would for a sprain, was advisable.

While restricting movement is key to ensuring the venom’s progress throughout the body is slowed, Mr Morrison said snapping a photo of the snake with a could help medical staff.

“They can then identify what snake it is,” he said.

Mr Morrison said many types of non-venomous snakes, such as pythons and tree snakes, were active at night despite being cold-blooded.

He said venomous snakes were usually most active during the day, looking for food and heat.

“It would be interesting to know what he got bitten by,” Mr Morrison said.

“But I highly doubt it would have been something venomous. For him to have been bitten, he would have basically have had to have stood on it.”

Mr Morrison said he had been called out to three jobs on Tuesday alone, with snake activity not yet slowing despite the cooler weather.

Anyone who photographs a snake can share it via Mr Morrison’s Facebook page Redland’s Snake Catcher for identification.