Redland organic growers will look at how community gardens function

INTEREST in community gardens is growing as people become more informed about where their food comes from and the quality of food in supermarkets.

BETHANIA STREET: Bethania Street Community Garden secretary Linda Barrett Linda Barrett has been a volunteer since it began a decade ago.

BETHANIA STREET: Bethania Street Community Garden secretary Linda Barrett Linda Barrett has been a volunteer since it began a decade ago.

ROGI at its September 12 meeting focuses on all aspects of community gardens with guest speakers from groups at Oaklands Street, Alexandra Hills and Bethania Street Lota.

Research suggests people have perceptions that food gardening requires lots of time but this is not the case, according to garden organisers.

LUSH CONDITIONS: People could spend as much time in a community garden as they can afford.

LUSH CONDITIONS: People could spend as much time in a community garden as they can afford.

Linda Barrett, secretary at Bethania Street Garden, has been a volunteer since its inception a decade ago. She said people could spend as much time in the garden as they could afford, as long as it was fairly regular.

“Most would spend about two to three hours a week and it doesn’t have to be in the garden to share in the harvest,” Linda said.

COMMUNITY: Plants of all types are grown.

COMMUNITY: Plants of all types are grown.

“We have 100 members who partake in all kinds of jobs – weeding, raking, watering or even baking cakes for morning tea.

“Some just want to enjoy the garden and support it financially so that we can purchase tools and other equipment.”

All questions about community gardens will be answered at the Redland Organic Growers’ meeting on Wednesday, September 12 at 7pm (6.15pm for organic shopping).

The meeting will be at the Salvation Army premises, corner of McDonald Road and MacArthur Street, Alexandra Hills. Entry is $5 and supper is served afterwards.