Redland City Council rejects proposed law to own four dogs

A PROPOSAL to allow Redland City residents to apply to own four dogs has been quashed by council after community objections.

Laws that require neighbours’ approval for a third animal permit will remain.

REJECTED: Councillors voted against a draft law that made provision for a fourth dog permit approval for residents of properties more than 6000 square metres.

REJECTED: Councillors voted against a draft law that made provision for a fourth dog permit approval for residents of properties more than 6000 square metres.

The decision follows a debate by councillors about the contentious changes to local animal legislation on Wednesday.

Nearly 100 submissions were made about the keeping of animals when draft laws were put up for public consultation in May.

A total of 85 submissions stated that four dogs on large properties would cause more attacks on wildlife, 65 said four dogs would cause noise nuisance from barking and 50 said an increase in dogs conflicted with the Redlands Coast branding and naturally wonderful tagline.

The Koala Action Group’s Debbie Pointing said it was a positive move by council to reject the proposed changes.

“It is well known that when there are more than two dogs they have a pack mentality,” Ms Pointing said.

She said council also needed to ramp up activities against dog owners who did the wrong thing.

The draft law made provision for a fourth dog permit approval for residents of properties more than 6000 square metres and outside the urban footprint. It also proposed removing the requirement of neighbour approval for a third animal permit.

Cr Murray Elliott said the requirement that residents get a permit for a third dog only with their neighbours’ approval should remain.

However, Cr Julie Talty said the requirement should be removed to bring Redland City Council in line with other councils.

She said the law requiring neighbours’ approval did not represent the community values.

Cr Lance Hewlett said neighbours should be considered if a resident wanted a third dog.

“This position should be one that covers the whole city, including rural areas, as wildlife and environmental concerns need to be addressed as well,” he said.

“We process a very significant number of dog complaints every year.”

Notices about the proposed law changes were placed in the Redland City Bulletin, at two supermarkets and a shopping centre and at ferry terminals.

Cr Talty said consultation with people living on acreages had been insufficient.