Redland Hospital surgeons get hands on high-tech laparoscopic imaging machine

TOP GEAR: Karl Storz rep Paul Sheriden with surgical services nurse unit manager Andrew O’Brien and Director of Surgery Dr Charles Nankivell. Photo: Supplied
TOP GEAR: Karl Storz rep Paul Sheriden with surgical services nurse unit manager Andrew O’Brien and Director of Surgery Dr Charles Nankivell. Photo: Supplied

A PIECE of high-tech medical equipment is helping surgeons at Redland Hospital to navigate digestive tracks and abdomens with ease. 

The 4k imaging stack made by Karl Storz Endoscopy helps doctors to see the smallest of blood vessels, ulcers and tissues up close, providing magnified imagery up to four times clearer than captured by older equipment.

A Redland Hospital spokesperson said the hospital was the first in Queensland to buy the laparoscopic imaging machine, which was being trialled by other hospitals.

The machine was delivered ahead of Christmas as part of the hospital’s equipment replacement program.

Surgical services nurse unit manager Andrew O’Brien said the laparoscopic imaging unit’s imaging quality, depth perception and colour renditions were outstanding.

“It’s fantastic that we now have the best piece of equipment available for Redland Hospital patients that will be used every day for any laparoscopic or endoscopic surgeries,” he said.

“The imaging is so crisp, it will make the surgeons’ job so much easier.”

A pair of virtual reality goggles has also been delivered to the hospital’s emergency department, helping to distract children undergoing treatment.

The $350 goggles took the wearer on journeys to museums, underwater and elsewhere while doctors and nurses performed procedures like taking bloods or inserting a cannula.

Alexandra Hills girl Sabrina, 5, is taken on a fun journey while wearing virtual reality goggles, with nurse Katrina Adams. Photo: Supplied

Alexandra Hills girl Sabrina, 5, is taken on a fun journey while wearing virtual reality goggles, with nurse Katrina Adams. Photo: Supplied

Dr Dominik Rutz said the ED could make young patients anxious, making it difficult for staff to performing some procedures.

“In paediatric patients distraction is quite vital to perform procedures like inserting a cannula,” he said.

“These virtual reality goggles help distract the children who may not even realise a procedure is being performed.”

The goggles were bought by the Redland Hospital Auxiliary group, with extra pairs already on the hospital’s equipment wish list.