One in 10 children with head injuries have persistent symptoms, says University of Queensland researchers

Sleep problems, fatigue and attention difficulties in the weeks after a child's concussion injury could signal reduced brain function and decreased grey matter.

HEAD INJURIES: Most children recover after a concussion.

HEAD INJURIES: Most children recover after a concussion.

University of Queensland researcher have studied concussion symptoms and their link to poorer recovery outcomes.

UQ Child Health Research Centre research fellow Dr Kartik Iyer said study information could help parents and doctors assess the risk of long-term disability.

"In the MRI scans of children with persistent concussion symptoms, poor sleep was linked to decreases in brain grey matter and reduced brain function," Dr Iyer said. "...It is critical that children who receive a head injury see a doctor and get professional medical advice soon after their injury... Children should wear proper protective head gear to minimise the impact.

"...For children with persistent concussion symptoms, a child-friendly non-invasive brain stimulation therapy is being trialled." Families can contact the Acquired Brain Injury team.