Victoria Point resident urges council to install a ramp, steps after rock seawall is installed at an Orana Street beach

A VICTORIA Point resident says a rock seawall built by council has cut off access to a popular Orana Street beach.

EXPANSIVE: Ron McCann is taking the fight to council over rocks placed along a seawall at Orana Street, Victoria Point. Photo: Jordan Crick.

EXPANSIVE: Ron McCann is taking the fight to council over rocks placed along a seawall at Orana Street, Victoria Point. Photo: Jordan Crick.

Ron McCann, who lives nearby, said the loose rocks posed a safety hazard and were council's cheap answer to erosion.

"They could do something better but they just throw them down indiscriminately and now they have denied access to people who want to bring their kids down to the beach," he said.

"It is a beautiful sandy area and people have always swum here. I spoke to some people the other day from Redland Bay who came here to access this little area because it is a great spot."

"Getting down there is a problem now. All we are asking for is some steps or access so we don't have to walk over the rocks."

A council spokesperson said the rocks were put down in October to reduce the impact of erosion by tides, currents and waves.

"All seawalls across Redlands Coast are regularly inspected by council officers to ensure they perform their function and minimise public safety hazards," a council spokesperson said.

"Rock seawalls like this are not designed or intended to be used as access to the water line, as foreshore access generally consists of stairs or ramps, which are designed according to national safety standards.

"The provision of stairs or a ramp at this location may be considered by council in future works under the foreshore protection capital works program."

Mr McCann said the beach was popular with locals and visitors from nearby suburbs.

"There is a ramp 800 metres on each side but you have to walk right around the trees to get back to the beach which everyone considers their favourite spot," he said.

"It is a unique spot compared to a lot of areas here where there's only very short foreshores and places with silty and muddy sand.

"We often get up to 10 people here on a weekend having a swim and bringing their grandkids down. At low-tide there is about 25 to 30 metres of sand."

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