Victoria Point artist Ron Duncan to create 60 pieces for new Gold Coast airport hotel

ABSTRACT ARTIST: Victoria Point's Ron Duncan has been tasked with creating 60 paintings for a new hotel opening on the Gold Coast this year.
ABSTRACT ARTIST: Victoria Point's Ron Duncan has been tasked with creating 60 paintings for a new hotel opening on the Gold Coast this year.

THE work of Victoria Point artist Ron Duncan is set to be seen by thousands of visitors to Queensland on the walls of a new hotel being built on the Gold Coast.

The Gold Coast International Airport Hotel, scheduled to open in mid-2020, will feature 60 of Mr Duncan's paintings showcasing some of the region's landmarks.

Mr Duncan, a resident of Renaissance Retirement Village, is a former hotelier and said he was thrilled to be able to contribute his art.

The abstract paintings are inspired by natural features in south-east Queensland and northern NSW, including bushland near Mount Warning and coral around Cook Island, near Tweed Heads.

They are based on photos taken by Mr Duncan on his travels around the region.

"It's not so much the content, it's the colour," he said.

"How are you going to feel when you walk down that passage? Are you going to feel comfortable?

"It's an airport hotel. It's not like a tourist resort or a tourist hotel where you might have somebody staying for two or three weeks. An airport hotel is very much in and out - it might just be one night or not even that.

"You're probably dealing with a lot of people who aren't going to have a lot of time to come outside of the airport, so let's try and get something that at least reflects the local area."

Mr Duncan is also the hotel's chief project consultant.

The hotel will be a short walk via a covered walkway from the new international terminal entrance at Coolangatta.

Each of its six accommodation levels will feature 10 of Mr Duncan's pieces.

With about half the paintings finished, Mr Duncan will be busy for the next several months working on the remainder before the hotel opens mid-year.

"If you're really into it, you can get one finished in a week. Sometimes you're not happy with it, you want to change it, you might leave it alone for two weeks," he said.

"It's not a 9am to 5pm sort of thing. When the creative juices are flowing, you work on it. When they're not, you're better off going to play golf."

Mr Duncan, who also paints portraits, said he relished the chance to throw paint around in a more relaxed fashion.

"Many a painting will not turn out how you first intended it to and that's okay."