Russell Island dog owner pleads guilty in Cleveland court to failing to care for his dog which was covered in fleas, mange and infections.

A RUSSELL Island resident's failure to provide veterinary care and appropriate living conditions for his dog has cost him $4000 after RSPCA inspectors found the animal wormy, mangy, flea riddled and stinking.

BEFORE: The Russell Island dog when seized by RSPCA inspectors, riddled with fleas, mange and worms.

BEFORE: The Russell Island dog when seized by RSPCA inspectors, riddled with fleas, mange and worms.

AFTER: The dog who hair quickly returned after veterinary treatment for fleas and other problems.

AFTER: The dog who hair quickly returned after veterinary treatment for fleas and other problems.

The man pleaded guilty in the Cleveland Magistrates Court to two charges although no conviction was recorded.

The dog was seized and treated by the RSPCA and is now up for adoption.

RSPCA inspector Tracey Jackson said outside court that the dog's poor condition was first reported in early 2017 by Redland City Council and islanders.

GOOD TIMES: The dog now has a happy and healthy life in the hands of a carer.

GOOD TIMES: The dog now has a happy and healthy life in the hands of a carer.

Inspector Jackson said the cattle cross was also lame but the owner did not treat the animal for the injury, nor a flea infestation, scabs and hair loss.

A neighbour took the dog to the vet after it became clear the owner would not do so.

"Despite numerous subsequent attendances by inspectors and formal directions being given to the defendant ... he did not comply with veterinary recommendations for (the) leg injury, and it was ultimately left to heal without further treatment," she said.

OUTCOME: The cattle cross is now well and happy and enjoying clean conditions after RSPCA and carers attended to its health.

OUTCOME: The cattle cross is now well and happy and enjoying clean conditions after RSPCA and carers attended to its health.

In November, 2018, inspectors contacted the owner after the dogs were reportedly left without food for three days and were roaming the streets. The owner did not respond.

In January last year an inspector went to the property, treated the dog for free and gave the owner advice.

In October the RSPCA received a complaint that the owner's three dogs were attached to each other on a single chain which was not tied to anything, were roaming and had become tangled in a tree.

An inspector investigated and the dog's owner said he had been treating the cattle cross' hair loss with antiseptic and cream. In December the three dogs were impounded.

RSPCA chief vet Anne Chester found the cattle cross' skin was red, had scabs and pustules, and was flea ridden. It had hookworm and ear infections, was in poor condition and its remaining teeth were worn from constant scratching.

In court solicitor Thomas Christie said his client would consent to cost orders, but opposed forfeiting the dog's ownership.

He said his client loved the dog which had always been prone to skin conditions. His client had put up $1000 to pay for injections and had obtained council permission to have a third dog at his property.

The RSPCA argued the owner's long failure to care for the dog would see RSPCA inspectors back at the property after the $1000 ran out.

Magistrate Deborah Vasta said costs and the disposal order were sufficient punishment, noting that there was no malice in his offending.

The man was ordered to pay the RSPCA $3428 for vet and boarding, $500 in legal costs and $101 for costs of summons. The dog's ownership was transferred to the RSPCA.