Redland hazard reduction burns under way in Scribbly Gums Conservation Area

HAZARD reduction burns are in full swing, with a blaze under way in the Scribbly Gums Conservation Area at Alexandra Hills.

SAFER CONDITIONS: A Redland City Council worker at today's hazard reduction burn.

SAFER CONDITIONS: A Redland City Council worker at today's hazard reduction burn.

Redland City Council crews are taking advantage of cool conditions and light winds, with further burns planned at Mount Cotton, Redland Bay and Daisy Hill.

Ironically, an extra hazard for homes and crews working in the Winchester Road area today were piles of palm fronds, plants and garden waste dumped on public land at the back of houses.

RESIDENTIAL MADNESS: A worker monitors a blaze as dangerous piles of rubbish dumped at the back of homes in the Scribbly Gums Conservation Reserve goes up.

RESIDENTIAL MADNESS: A worker monitors a blaze as dangerous piles of rubbish dumped at the back of homes in the Scribbly Gums Conservation Reserve goes up.

In 2017 after major fires on Southern Moreton Bay Islands an independent report ordered by Redland City Council found that a contributing factor to extremely high fire danger on the islands and some parts of the mainland was vegetation and rubbish dumping.

The Queensland Fire and Emergency Services report, which also was critical of council, said residents were responsible for dangerously high levels of dumped household, commercial and green waste, tyres, oils and building materials.

Yesterday crews also burnt part of the Squirrel Glider Conservation Area at nearby McMillan Road.

Heinemann Road and Sanctuary Drive conservation areas at Mount Cotton are scheduled for Thursday and Bayview Conservation Area at nearby Redland Bay on Friday.

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service warned that smoke from a burn at Daisy Hill Conservation Park on Wednesday might be seen in Sheldon, Mount Cotton, Cornubia and Shailer Park.

They urged motorists to take care as smoke might decrease visibility. Burn dates are subject to change pending weather conditions.

Australia was wracked by disastrous fires last spring and summer as abnormally hot and dry conditions combined to produce unprecedented dangers.

Scientists have since warned that such fire seasons could become normal unless the world moves rapidly to curb emissions of greenhouse gases driving global warming.

DANGER: Flames rise metres into the air from piles of rubbish. A QFS report in 2017 found that many residents' activities contributed to dangerous fire conditions.

DANGER: Flames rise metres into the air from piles of rubbish. A QFS report in 2017 found that many residents' activities contributed to dangerous fire conditions.