Redlands 2030 members rally at Cleveland to protest $1.4 billion Toondah Harbour development ahead of polling day

PROTEST group Redlands 2030 have ramped up their fight against the proposed Toondah Harbour development less than two weeks out from the state election.

TOONDAH TROUBLE: Michele Wilkinson protests the Toondah Harbour development at a Cleveland rally held ahead of the election. Photo: Chris Walker

TOONDAH TROUBLE: Michele Wilkinson protests the Toondah Harbour development at a Cleveland rally held ahead of the election. Photo: Chris Walker

About 30 people gathered for a rally at Cleveland's Finucane Road on Wednesday morning to protest the $1.4 billion development.

Their aim was to remind residents of the impacts they believe the project will have on Moreton Bay marine park at Cleveland, where 3600 units are to be built by Walker Corp.

The Redland City Bulletin asked MPs in August about where they stood on the project.

Incumbent Labor MP Don Brown said he had always supported the development, provided it stacked up environmentally, while Oodgeroo MP Mark Robinson said it was a federal matter to be decided by scientists.

Redlands 2030 president Steve MacDonald said Toondah was very much a state election issue and voters could send a message to the government on polling day.

"Research is clear that locals don't want a new town made up of 3600 units in multiple high-rise towers for about 8000 people built in Moreton Bay ... " he said.

NO TO UNITS: About 30 people turned out at Cleveland on Wednesday morning to protest the proposed Toondah Harbour development. Photo: Chris Walker

NO TO UNITS: About 30 people turned out at Cleveland on Wednesday morning to protest the proposed Toondah Harbour development. Photo: Chris Walker

Toondah Harbour communications manager Dolan Hayes said the redevelopment had received support from both major parties but there had been limited mention of the project in election debates.

"We continue to get great feedback about the project from visitors to our Toondah Harbour information centre at Cleveland and through our engagement program across the Redlands, including our recent online series of talk Toondah sessions," he said.

"A few weeks ago we were pleased to see the project identified by the Redland Chamber of Commerce in a major economic report as being critical to the future prosperity of the region."

Mr MacDonald said only after the release of images commissioned by independent Oodgeroo candidate Claire Richardson did the community get a good look at the development.

"Until then, we were being shown benign, cherry-picked features without a high rise apartment building in sight," he said.

"Victoria, New South Wales and Tasmania have banned this type of development for a very good reason, and it's time Queensland did the same."

Mr Hayes said the project benefits as Walker Corp saw them had been recognised by all levels of government.

"Over its delivery timeframe of 15 to 20 years, Toondah Harbour will generate 1000 jobs each year during construction," he said.

"It will also generate 500 jobs in the precinct itself as a lifestyle destination and a further 500 tourism jobs in the wider region on the back of the expected 50,000 additional visitors."

An environmental impact assessment of the proposal is due for completion before the end of 2020.

Work on the project could begin within the next few years if it is approved.

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