Carpet snake invites itself into Cr Wendy Boglary's chicken coop over Easter weekend

A CARPET python was a surprise visitor at Cr Wendy Boglary's Wellington Point property over the Easter weekend.

SURPRISE GUEST: A carpet python slithered into Cr Wendy Boglary's chicken coop over the Easter weekend. Photo: Wendy Boglary

SURPRISE GUEST: A carpet python slithered into Cr Wendy Boglary's chicken coop over the Easter weekend. Photo: Wendy Boglary

The snake slithered into the Redland councillor's chicken coop on Saturday, seemingly determined to have its own Easter egg hunt.

Cr Boglary said the snake had curled up in the rafters of the coop, not far from her three chickens.

"I thought 'oh no, you're going on your own egg hunt'," she said.

" ... I called a snake catcher the next day but he moved, and we don't know where he's moved to.

"I think he may have gone back into the shed, because it would have been drier and warmer in there."

Cr Boglary said she was happy for carpet pythons to take up residence in her shed, as long as they steered clear of the chicken coop.

"... Being a country girl I think a carpet snake in the shed is good for the rats and mice," she said.

"It is a deal so long as they don't go near the chook house."

The snake's surprise visit comes about a week after a red-bellied black snake made its way into the starting boxes at the Capalaba greyhound track.

Snake catcher Brendan 'Harpsnake' Dyer said there were a few reasons snakes were active at the moment.

"Flood events wash a lot of snakes out of their hiding places and what not," he said.

"We are also reaching a time where the cooler nights are coming on and snakes are realising it's not that long until winter.

"Female snakes especially are thinking 'I have to fatten up before winter, because I'm not going to eat for three months'.

"In Queensland they don't truly hibernate. When you get a warm day in the middle of winter they will go out for food and get a sun bake in."

Cr Boglary said a few snakes had visited her property over the years, but none of them had been venomous.

"I think they (snakes) come from the Geoff Skinner Wetlands, because I'm not far from there," she said.

Mr Dyer said a large percentage of his calls outs were for carpet pythons, but he also had to deal with another type of snake after wet weather.

"I get more white crown snakes after heavy rain events than I would normally get with them," he said.

"Whether it is displaced animals due to rain events or during normal times, the most common species would be the carpet snake.

"I mostly get carpet snakes, followed by tree snakes and freshwater snakes."

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