BirdLife Australia marks World Migratory Bird Day with twilight rally at GJ Walter Park

BIRD LIFE: The rally for International Migratory Bird Day attracted a crowd to GJ Walter park in 2019. Photo: Chris Walker
BIRD LIFE: The rally for International Migratory Bird Day attracted a crowd to GJ Walter park in 2019. Photo: Chris Walker

BirdLife Australia will mark World Migratory Bird Day with twilight stand against Toondah Harbour development.

Residents will form a line of lights along the shore at GJ Walter Park on Saturday at 5pm.

A bi-annual event, World Migratory Bird Day celebrates migratory birds and their incredible journeys across the globe and highlights the need to protect their habitat.

Joining community residents at Toondah Harbour will be a 4 metre giant puppet of an Eastern Curlew, an endangered bird that migrates annually between Toondah Harbour and Moreton Bay wetland and the Arctic.

BirdLife Southern Queensland Convenor, Judith Hoyle said this year marked the 50th anniversary of the first signing of the Ramsar treaty, and represented a historic milestone for environmental management.

"The community will be gathering together on Saturday not only to celebrate our incredible Migratory shorebirds but also to send a strong message to federal Environment Minister Sussan Ley that Toondah Harbour and Moreton Bay Ramsar wetland must be protected," she said.

Australian Conservation Foundation nature campaigner Tarquin Moon said Toondah Harbour supported more than 40,000 waterbirds, comprising around 43 shorebird species and 32 migratory species.

"A significant proportion of the world's Eastern Curlews and Grey-tailed tattlers feed and recuperate at the wetland following their epic journey from the northern hemisphere," she said.

She said World Migratory Bird Day was a time to marvel at the incredible journey made by birds that flew across the globe.

"Toondah Harbour's mangroves, seagrass meadows and sheltered inlets also provide important habitat for numerous fish species, dugongs, dolphins, whales and sea turtles."

She encouraged anyone who loved Toondah to join in celebrating the ecologically important and much-loved community asset.