MEET THE LOCALS

Driven Alexandra Hills racer on track to be motorsport champ

Alexandra Hills' own driving prodigy is still in high school, but he is already on track to become a big name in racing.

ON TRACK: Antonieff started racing go-karts but now drives a Westfield Clubman which has been driven by his father and grandfather before him.

ON TRACK: Antonieff started racing go-karts but now drives a Westfield Clubman which has been driven by his father and grandfather before him.

Xander Antonieff started racing go-karts when he was just 9-years-old, and is now forging a career in Australian motorsports.

The 17-year-old boasts a number of accolades across just eight years of racing.

"I love everything about racing, the speed, the adrenaline, the culture, the people, everything," Antonieff said.

"It's such a fun sport and I absolutely love it."

When he was 12, Antonieff became the youngest person to hold a national racing license in Australia, which allowed him to compete in the Hyundai Series under Track Attack Australia.

In 2019, at 14-years-old he got his Motorsport Australia license, and in the same year, finished fifth in the Queensland Racing Driver Championship to win the rookie of the year award.

Following a year off racing when the COVID pandemic hit, Antonieff was keen to get back on the bitumen.

In 2021 he started racing a different car, carrying a family legacy in a Westfield Clubman which has been driven by his father and grandfather before him.

It took him all the way to win the Queensland Racing Drivers Championship in his category for 2021.

At the same time he also competed in a Queensland Racing Drivers Association club championship, placing second behind a formula three car.

CHAMPION: 17-year-old Xander Antonieff won the Queensland Racing Drivers Association club Championship in his category for 2021.

CHAMPION: 17-year-old Xander Antonieff won the Queensland Racing Drivers Association club Championship in his category for 2021.

"It was amazing that I was managing to compete with it as it's a completely different car," he said

"They are more expensive, more high powered and really quick, and I came so close to getting the overall championship but missed a couple of rounds."

Antonieff is working on completing year 12 at Capalaba State College while doing an apprenticeship at a high performance garage at Capalaba on top of his racing commitments.

"It's really busy because I've got schoolwork and I've got to put time aside to train in my simulator at home a couple hours a day, and go to the gym to get my physical up and running." he said

"It's really important to train on the simulator to make sure I'm up to speed, it's just practice, practice, practice.

"Weekends have to be clear because Friday, Saturday and Sunday I'll be out on the track racing."

Antonieff said he had no plans to slow down ahead for 2022.

"I'll keep racing but I'm really trying to get into TA2, that's my main goal," he said.

Read more local news at redlandcitybulletin.com.au.