Straddie: top spot to watch whales

Updated June 15 2015 - 4:30pm, first published 4:00pm
Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) [Corrected ID 14 June 2013]as seen on a Dos Osos boat Sub Sea Tour whale watching outing 11 June 2013, Morro Bay, CA, USA. Owner and Skipper Kevin Winfield, Mate Mario. During this trip we saw dozens of Humpback Whales and Blue Whales. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humpback_whale says "The humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a species of baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12-16 metres (39-52 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. An acrobatic animal known for breaching and slapping the water with its tail and pectorals, it is popular with whale watchers off Australia, New Zealand, South America, Canada, and the United States.  ?en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_whale says "The blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the suborder of baleen whales (called Mysticeti). At 30 metres (98 ft)[4] in length and 170 tonnes (190 short tons) or more in weight, it is the largest known animal to have ever existed.  ?Sub Sea Tours is at the base of Pacific Avenue at 699 Embarcadero Road in Morro Bay, CA. More info at Sub Sea Tours and Kayaks, Morro Bay Charters 699 Embarcadero Road #9
Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) [Corrected ID 14 June 2013]as seen on a Dos Osos boat Sub Sea Tour whale watching outing 11 June 2013, Morro Bay, CA, USA. Owner and Skipper Kevin Winfield, Mate Mario. During this trip we saw dozens of Humpback Whales and Blue Whales. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humpback_whale says "The humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a species of baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12-16 metres (39-52 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. An acrobatic animal known for breaching and slapping the water with its tail and pectorals, it is popular with whale watchers off Australia, New Zealand, South America, Canada, and the United States. ?en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_whale says "The blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the suborder of baleen whales (called Mysticeti). At 30 metres (98 ft)[4] in length and 170 tonnes (190 short tons) or more in weight, it is the largest known animal to have ever existed. ?Sub Sea Tours is at the base of Pacific Avenue at 699 Embarcadero Road in Morro Bay, CA. More info at Sub Sea Tours and Kayaks, Morro Bay Charters 699 Embarcadero Road #9
DCIM\100GOPRO\GOPR0692.
DCIM\100GOPRO\GOPR0692.
Straddie: top spot to watch whales
Straddie: top spot to watch whales
Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) [Corrected ID 14 June 2013]as seen on a Dos Osos boat Sub Sea Tour whale watching outing 11 June 2013, Morro Bay, CA, USA. Owner and Skipper Kevin Winfield, Mate Mario. During this trip we saw dozens of Humpback Whales and Blue Whales. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humpback_whale says "The humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a species of baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12-16 metres (39-52 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. An acrobatic animal known for breaching and slapping the water with its tail and pectorals, it is popular with whale watchers off Australia, New Zealand, South America, Canada, and the United States.  ?en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_whale says "The blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the suborder of baleen whales (called Mysticeti). At 30 metres (98 ft)[4] in length and 170 tonnes (190 short tons) or more in weight, it is the largest known animal to have ever existed.  ?Sub Sea Tours is at the base of Pacific Avenue at 699 Embarcadero Road in Morro Bay, CA. More info at Sub Sea Tours and Kayaks, Morro Bay Charters 699 Embarcadero Road #9
Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) [Corrected ID 14 June 2013]as seen on a Dos Osos boat Sub Sea Tour whale watching outing 11 June 2013, Morro Bay, CA, USA. Owner and Skipper Kevin Winfield, Mate Mario. During this trip we saw dozens of Humpback Whales and Blue Whales. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humpback_whale says "The humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a species of baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12-16 metres (39-52 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. An acrobatic animal known for breaching and slapping the water with its tail and pectorals, it is popular with whale watchers off Australia, New Zealand, South America, Canada, and the United States. ?en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_whale says "The blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the suborder of baleen whales (called Mysticeti). At 30 metres (98 ft)[4] in length and 170 tonnes (190 short tons) or more in weight, it is the largest known animal to have ever existed. ?Sub Sea Tours is at the base of Pacific Avenue at 699 Embarcadero Road in Morro Bay, CA. More info at Sub Sea Tours and Kayaks, Morro Bay Charters 699 Embarcadero Road #9
Straddie: top spot to watch whales
Straddie: top spot to watch whales
DCIM\100GOPRO\GOPR0692.
DCIM\100GOPRO\GOPR0692.
Straddie: top spot to watch whales
Straddie: top spot to watch whales
Straddie: top spot to watch whales
Straddie: top spot to watch whales
Straddie: top spot to watch whales
Straddie: top spot to watch whales
Whales breach off Point LookoutPhoto by Chris McCormack
Whales breach off Point LookoutPhoto by Chris McCormack

NORTH STradbroke Island is home to the best place on the east coast of Australia to view humpback whales, and Point Lookout is arguably the best land-based location for watching the mammals in the world, according to marine research scientist, Dr Michael Noad.

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