Snakes not slowing down in the cold weather

THE cold weather has not kept snakes away with Redlands catcher Tony Morrison having encounters with pythons at a child care centre and a school, and identifying one of the biggest eastern brown snakes he has ever seen.

Mr Morrison said a Wellington Point resident had asked him to identify the eastern brown snake she photographed in her back yard.

VISITOR: This eastern brown snake was photographed by a Wellington Point resident. Photo: Redlands Snake Catcher Tony Morrison

VISITOR: This eastern brown snake was photographed by a Wellington Point resident. Photo: Redlands Snake Catcher Tony Morrison

This week he has also been called to Little Ducks Childcare Birkdale to retrieve a small python from a storage shed, and returned to a state school for the third time in about as many weeks.

“They had a rat problem which brought a snake problem,” he said.

“We caught one python in the garden and two wrapped in the roofing of a covered walkway.”

The photograph of the eastern brown snake attracted a strong following on Mr Morrison’s Facebook page with more than 21,000 views, 433 comments and 100 shares within a few days.

It was mostly because of the size of the snake.

Mr Morrison said the species was fairly common in the area.

“We do get brown snakes here but they are usually smaller than the one pictured,” he said.

“It was a very big and healthy eastern brown snake.”

Mr Morrison said the resident who found it put out seed for wild birds in her garden.

“I receive many calls from people who feed birds.

“Not all the seed is eaten so that attracts mice and rats, which then attract snakes.”

Mr Morrison said eastern browns were highly venomous.

“When I come across them, I stop and think carefully about what I am doing. You know you can’t make even one mistake.”

Mr Morrison said anyone who saw a snake should step back and move away.

“A lot of snake bites occur when people try to kill a snake.

“They are so fast when you try to swing something down, whether you hit them or hit next to them, they are going to be really angry.”

He said the best response was to let a snake move on.

“They don’t want to attack you.

“It’s usually best to get your pets and keep them inside and leave the snake for an hour so that it can move on.”

Anyone who photographs a snake can share it via Mr Morrison’s Facebook page RedlandsSnakes for identification.

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