Quandamooka arts and cultural centre at Dunwich to attract tourists to North Stradbroke Island

Animation: Quandamooka Art, Museum and Performance Institute

AN ARTS and cultural centre at Dunwich is expected to generate more than $8.5 million for the local economy during construction and at least $2.5 million a year for local businesses once open.

Visiting Cleveland on Tuesday, Tourism Industry Minister Kate Jones said the Quandamooka Art, Museum and Performance Institute would attract more than 20,000 people annually to North Stradbroke Island.

She said the government had committed a further $4.5 million to build the centre, bringing the total to $9.5 million.

The centre to be known as QUAMPI, referring to the local pearl shell of oysters, will be at Deanbilla Bay.

Construction is expected to be finished by the end of next year.

Ms Jones said the Minjerribah cultural centre would share the art and culture of the Quandamooka people with a global audience.

"With conference and dining facilities by the waters of Deanbilla Bay in Goompi (Dunwich), this centre will allow local operators to tap into the growing business tourism market," she said.

"The centre will become a key link in south-east Queensland's tourism landscape - connecting Meeanjin (Brisbane) to Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island) in the itineraries of astute cultural tourists who we know stay longer and spend more.

VIEWING PLANS: Tourism Industry Minister Kate Jones and Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation chief executive Cameron Costello look at plans for the centre. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

VIEWING PLANS: Tourism Industry Minister Kate Jones and Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation chief executive Cameron Costello look at plans for the centre. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

"It will also become a launch point for the unique Indigenous tours and experiences available for visitors across the island."

The centre is part of the North Stradbroke Island's economic transition as sand-mining ends this year.

Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation chief executive Cameron Costello said Quandamooka culture was in a period of renaissance with language, traditional arts and crafts, particularly fibre art, dance and performance all thriving on Minjerribah.

CULTURAL LEADER: Quandamooka traditional owner Joshua Walker talks about the Quandamooka Art, Museum and Performance Institute. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

CULTURAL LEADER: Quandamooka traditional owner Joshua Walker talks about the Quandamooka Art, Museum and Performance Institute. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

"QUAMPI will be the centrepiece for Quandamooka culture, providing an authentic Indigenous experience for visitors, as well as a place for our people to come together and explore and strengthen culture, providing a source of ongoing employment and pride for our community," Mr Costello said.

Ms Jones said the project would create 37 jobs, 18 of which would be ongoing.

"We're committed to developing new attractions on North Stradbroke Island to create jobs for locals," Ms Jones said.

"More than ever before, we're seeing that tourists want a unique cultural experience when they come to Australia. Minjerribah's rich culture and natural beauty is its greatest asset."

Mr Costello said PriceWaterhouseCoopers had estimated the construction would generate about $5 million in Indigenous sub-contracts.

Most of this would be through payments to Indigenous suppliers based on Minjerribah, including QYAC officers.

For information, to complete a survey on the centre and to attend consultation meetings, visit quampi.com.au.