Redlanders urged to save water as weather outlook points to dry January

THE Redlands may have seen its last decent rain for some time, with hot and dry conditions for much of January set to put a strain on water resources.

STEAMY: Hot, dry and windy conditions blot out city views at Cleveland Point. Redlanders are being urged to save water as dry weather sets in around the south-east during January. Photo: Brian Williams

STEAMY: Hot, dry and windy conditions blot out city views at Cleveland Point. Redlanders are being urged to save water as dry weather sets in around the south-east during January. Photo: Brian Williams

There is little to no rain forecast for the rest of this week and the Weather Bureau expects that trend to continue for the remainder of this month as temperatures hover around 30 degrees.

The bureau rates Cleveland and surrounding suburbs an 87 per cent chance of receiving 25mm this month, which is less than the total rainfall received over two days in December when storms lashed south-east Queensland.

It would also be significantly less than the Redlands' January rainfall average of 160mm.

North Stradbroke Island looks to be Redlands' best chance of rain, with 50 to 100mm a 75 per cent chance of falling between now and the end of the month.

In any case, weather models predict that Redlands is about a 25 per cent chance of beating the January average.

The dry weather comes as residents are urged to make water savings their number one priority in 2020.

Water authorities said combined dam levels were now at 56.4 per cent capacity amid another month of high water consumption.

Water use across south-east Queensland averaged 210 litres per person per day in December, 20 litres more than the same time last year.

Redlanders were rated the second highest water users in the south-east during November, having used about 30 litres per day more than they did in 2018.

Seqwater chief executive Neil Brennan said the new year provided a timely reminder for locals to renew their efforts to save water around the house and garden.

"We have certainly seen a very dry December resulting in record high temperatures together with water use above 200 litres per person per day,'' he said.

"We are calling on all South East Queenslanders to reduce their water use to 150 litres per person per day and help preserve our dam levels for as long as we can."

Another failed wet season could result in the combined dam level dropping to 50 per cent.

Region-wide water restrictions like those seen in Canungra would be considered if it reached this point.

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