Capalaba scientist Dr Colin Limpus recognised in Queen's Birthday honours list after decades of groundbreaking work in the field of environmental science

PROMINENT Capalaba scientist Dr Colin Limpus has been recognised in the Queen's Birthday honours list for his contributions to environmental science.

SHARP MIND: Dr Colin Limpus has spent decades in the field of environmental science. He has been rewarded with recognition on the Queen's Birthday honours list.

SHARP MIND: Dr Colin Limpus has spent decades in the field of environmental science. He has been rewarded with recognition on the Queen's Birthday honours list.

Mr Limpus, who has lived in the Redlands for about 30 years, said he felt humbled to be made an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO).

"It is an honour, and from a personal perspective, it is rewarding for all of the years of work," he said.

"At the same time, I have this strong feeling that I couldn't have achieved what I have without the tremendous support from the various students that I have been fortunate enough to mentor.

"They are educating me while I am educating them."

Mr Limpus is currently an adjunct associate professor at the University of Queensland and James Cook University.

He said he enjoyed the academic challenges of teaching.

"The students are breaking new ground as they go into their studies," Mr Limpus said.

" ... There are really bright minds there and they are going on to make a difference. They are the next generation."

Mr Limpus received a lifetime achievement award from the International Turtle Society in 2008 and a Public Service Medal in 1993.

He said his work with sea turtles had thrown up a series of challenges over the years.

"The goal posts keep shifting," Mr Limpus said.

"Back in the 80s we identified falling as the main problem facing our turtles ... and so it took us a while to work that out and then find a solution.

"Today we have a couple of problems that didn't even exist 50 years ago, such as excessive lighting on coastal areas that are causing hatchlings to go inland instead of out to sea."

Mr Limpus has been an author of 150 scientific papers published on the topic.

He holds several roles at the Queensland Department of Environment and Science.

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