Wellington Point station master Christina Gardner pays homage to Australian native curlew birds

ON TRACK: Wellington Point station master Christina Gardner paints the curlews on platform 2.
ON TRACK: Wellington Point station master Christina Gardner paints the curlews on platform 2.

COMMUTERS catching a train from Wellington Point station are in for an artistic treat as a wildlife mural comes to life on platform two.

Station master Christina Gardner is painting the bird life at the station including a family of bush stone-curlew that have called the station home for many years.

"I watch the curlew nest in August to October, the mother sits on her eggs four about five weeks and I usually snap a pic and put up the photos for commuters to see," she said.

Ms Gardner said the idea for the painting project was planted during a time of uncertainty when the global COVID-19 pandemic struck.

"When customers began saying their farewells when they had to start working from home, I saw an opportunity to deliver the artwork.

"I wanted to give customers a nice surprise when they returned to the station and so I started designing the mural," she said.

ART: Station master Christina Gardner said being able to watch the mural progress each day, customers have enjoyed being part of the initiative.

ART: Station master Christina Gardner said being able to watch the mural progress each day, customers have enjoyed being part of the initiative.

Ms Gardner is an artist who enjoys painting wildlife and used to sell her cards and art at markets. She has worked at the station for about a year but has fond memories of her childhood visiting her grandparents in their farm house opposite the station.

Starting her shift at the station at 5am, Ms Gardner finishes her duties and then starts work on her passion project. She said she hoped to have it completed in a couple weeks.

"I've continued the tradition in keeping customers updated with sightings of curlew hatchlings, making sure the birds have water, and reminding customers to take care near the nesting site," she said.

Capalaba MP Don Brown said he was delighted to see the artwork being delivered by one of the station's own.

"There is a great sense of community spirit in our community and it is fantastic to see the interest this mural has sparked," he said.

To date, the Queensland Rail's Positive pARTnerships program has delivered 176 urban art projects covering more than 26,000 square metres of the Queensland Rail network, including the Pillars Project series beneath the Merivale Bridge in South Brisbane and the Barracks and Airport line murals, seen by almost one million people each year.