MPs accuse state government of secrecy surrounding Straddie land rezoning. Planning Minister says decision means more consultation on development.

ISLAND PLAN: The planning instrument effectively re-zones areas of the island to facilitate development.
ISLAND PLAN: The planning instrument effectively re-zones areas of the island to facilitate development.

PLANNING Minister Cameron Dick has rejected claims of secrecy surrounding a planning decision that will facilitate residential development on North Stradbroke Island native title land.

It comes in response to fears raised by Oodgeroo MP Mark Robinson and Bowman MP Andrew Laming that there had been no community consultation on the plans.

The temporary planning instrument, published in Monday's Government Gazette, will be in place for the next two years and covers the newly-declared Quandamooka Land Aspirations Area, which includes native title land, in the island's three major townships of Amity, Dunwich and Point Lookout.

The planning instrument re-zones land, overruling that which is set out in Redland City Council's 2018 city plan.

However, according to Redland City Council they were not aware of the unusual use of a planning instrument to identify the lots and enact future land uses until advised by the state this week.

"The determination on the land uses gazetted this week have been part of confidential indigenous land use agreement negotiations between the Queensland government and QYAC over several years," a council spokesperson said.

Mr Dick said there were no development applications, nor had any land been transferred.

"This is a rezoning that allows the Straddie community to have their say on future opportunities around economic growth, jobs and housing on the island," he said.

Sites - predominantly marked for conservation in the city plan - have been earmarked for uses including low density residential, recreation and open space, community facilities, tourist accommodation, waterfront and marine industry and land set aside for emerging community use.

Emerging community zones are designated behind George Nothling Drive.

Emerging community zones are designated behind George Nothling Drive.

QYAC chief executive Cameron Costello said the changes would boost housing and land opportunities for the Quandamooka people.

Prime land on Mooloomba Road, opposite the steps down to Frenchman's Beach at Point Lookout with stunning ocean views, has been zoned low density residential development.

New residential zonings are in place on East Coast Road and Alfred Martin Way at Dunwich, as well as Miles Street and Kawana Street at Amity.

A large parcel of land near Claytons Road at Amity has been changed from conservation to recreation and open space.

At Ballow Road, Dunwich, near the Adams Beach campground, and East Coast Road near the bus terminal, land is zoned for waterfront and marine industry.

An emerging community zone has been created at Mitchell Street, Dunwich, as well as a significant area of bushland behind George Nothling Drive.

Tourist accommodation, community facilities and low-impact industry are marked out on George Nothling Drive at Point Lookout, similar to that set out in the city plan.

Mr Costello said the allocation of land had always been part of the native title settlement with the state government and council, with policies under development since 2012.

"Regrettably council chose not to include these in their draft Redland City Plan but the state government's action will now require council to address these shortfalls in their planning scheme," he said.

"The next step is for Quandamooka people to develop a land allocation policy and that will be a thorough consultative process that will require native title holder consent."

Council will still be responsible for assessing new development applications lodged over the 25 lots identified in the state's plan.

WORRIES: Oodgeroo MP Mark Robinson said he feared wildlife habitat could be cleared after the rezoning.

WORRIES: Oodgeroo MP Mark Robinson said he feared wildlife habitat could be cleared after the rezoning.

Development applications would have to comply with standard state and council planning rules.

Mr Laming said a priority development area had been dropped onto the island without consultation.

He said it was a blow to businesses giving it a go on the island and struggling to get government assistance through COVID-19.

Mr Robinson said the announcement had brought concerns about a lack of consultation and awareness over a decision that impacted hundreds of blocks across the island.

"Labor's land announcement was cloaked in secrecy, with no wider community input, including from the broader traditional Quandamooka elders," he said.

"I am deeply concerned that land on North Stradbroke Island zoned for conservation and potentially strategic koala habitat could be bulldozed or cleared, as was the case recently at Point Lookout."

Mr Dick said there had been nine years of consultation and discussion.

"If locals feel they are not being consulted, can I assure them they will be consulted for years to come as part of this process."