Self portrait chosen

SELF PORTAIT: Rod Bailey's self portrait is now hanging at Petrie Terrace, picked among hundreds of entries in the Brisbane Portrait Prize.

SELF PORTAIT: Rod Bailey's self portrait is now hanging at Petrie Terrace, picked among hundreds of entries in the Brisbane Portrait Prize.

Unless it sells, it is destined to hang in the kitchen of his Macleay Island house.

But in the meantime the self portrait of artist Rod Bailey is hanging at the Royal Queensland Art Society's Salon Des Refuses, in Petrie Terrace, chosen in the first 150 in the Brisbane Portrait Prize. The work named Decisions will remain there until November 1.

Mr Bailey said he wasn't a finalist (in the first 75), but was nevertheless thrilled to make it to the second batch and with that to have the potential to win a $500 prize. There were 776 paintings entered in the competition.

The painting was created by Mr Bailey for the Macleay Island Arts Complex monochrome competition.

"I did it in green and white for the competition and thought I'd have a go entering it in the Brisbane competition. It is the first time I have painted in acrylic," he said.

Mr Bailey has also painted portraits of six local people, forming the basis for his own exhibition to be staged at the Macleay Island gallery from November 28.

Portraits are The Ferry Master Johannes Smeets, Bread for Lamb baker John Le Bon (the bakery is now closed), Morning Painting house painter Jan Bray, Release the Dragon dragon boater Laurie O'Toole (deceased July 2019), Diwali Sammi cook Damenti Kuppsami and A Cut Above tree lopperCatherine Cullum.

He chose two of these to enter in the Brisbane competition with his self portrait.

"I took a selfie and this is where it ended up. I am thinking and looking up in the picture. I only did it because I couldn't think of anything else to paint," he said.

"I'm 62, but a few people have told me I look 80 years old. I'm not sure what to think about that," he said.

Mr Bailey said the portraits of the six Macleay Island residents have as yet been unseen and will be unveiled on the night of the exhibition opening.

Mr Bailey and his wife Fay moved to Macleay Island from Melbourne on retirement two years ago. Mr Bailey worked as a sales manager of a Melbourne manufacturing company and became interested in buying a house through Selling Houses, Australia. The couple are now regular painters and keen MIAC members.

"Previous to that I had probably done five paintings in 10 years," Mr Bailey said.

"We love it on the island. We have a nice group of friends and there is an inclusive art scene."