RSPCA Qld is swamped with almost 100 injured animals every day

THE RSPCA's wildlife hospital is swamped with patients as almost 100 animals a day are brought into care.

THIS IS SO SCARY: A fledgling boobook owl being cared for by RSPCA wildlife hospital staff. It came from Cleveland, Redlands.

THIS IS SO SCARY: A fledgling boobook owl being cared for by RSPCA wildlife hospital staff. It came from Cleveland, Redlands.

Spring is called trauma season by RSPCA wildlife staff because of the high number of casualties, especially with birds leaving the nest and attacks from cats and dogs, says RSPCA spokesman Michael Beatty.

"Our vets are seeing close to 100 patients a day," he said. "It's the breeding and birthing season so animals are on the move and giving birth.

"We're also seeing large numbers of baby birds, some of which maybe should have been left where they were.

KOALA IN TROUBLE: This koala is safe in the arms of RSPCA wildlife hospital nurse Jade Lecole. The koala has been called Wally, 'cause it was rescued by a family member of rugby league legend King Wally Lewis. The koala came from Braemore in the Somerset region.

KOALA IN TROUBLE: This koala is safe in the arms of RSPCA wildlife hospital nurse Jade Lecole. The koala has been called Wally, 'cause it was rescued by a family member of rugby league legend King Wally Lewis. The koala came from Braemore in the Somerset region.

"Sadly this happens all the time. People think they're doing the right thing by 'rescuing' chicks that are healthy and being looked after by their parents.

"They mean well but it often ends up very badly for the chicks."

RSPCA veternarians advise that if you find a chick, the first thing to establish is if it is a nestling or a fledgling?

If it does not have feathers, only fluffy down, then it is a nestling, and needs help straight away, as it cannot keep itself warm. Take it to a vet or bring it in to the RSPCA as soon as possible.

HELP ME: Once separated from their parents, it can be a hard life for birds as people cannot teach them all the things they need to know to survive in the bush. This forest kingfisher came from Yamanto, near Ipswich.

HELP ME: Once separated from their parents, it can be a hard life for birds as people cannot teach them all the things they need to know to survive in the bush. This forest kingfisher came from Yamanto, near Ipswich.

If the bird has its flight feathers, then it is a fledgling. Before rescuing a fledgling, ask yourself:

Is the bird calling or making a noise? Is the bird bright and responsive? Can the bird perch on your finger? Can the bird spread its wings evenly and flutter to the ground when encouraged to fly?

If the answer to these questions is yes, then the baby bird should be reunited with its parents. It is best for a baby bird to be with its parents, as no human can teach a bird all it needs to know to survive.

To try to reunite the baby with its parents, place it on a low branch in a bush and watch to see if the parents come to feed it. You can also place a chick in a bucket with a few drainage holes, some grass and a stick that will allow it to climb out. This will help protect baby birds from predators.

Cats and dogs kill and severely wound wildlife, particularly the young and flightless so pet ownership includes confining cats and dogs, particularly at night.

People can help native birds by planting bushy indigenous shrubs and ground cover to provide protection and camouflage.

This will help increase the survival rate, and will significantly reduce the injury and mortality rates of all wildlife.

BACKLOG: Wildlife piled up at reception at the RSPCA headquarters at Wacol on Brisbane's south-west.

BACKLOG: Wildlife piled up at reception at the RSPCA headquarters at Wacol on Brisbane's south-west.