Residents say no to Cleveland 124 unit transit oriented building despite Department of Transport giving it the nod

PROTEST: Sea Air units resident John Derbyshire and chairman of Villa Edgewater body corp Alb Carlton at Cleveland Railway Station.
PROTEST: Sea Air units resident John Derbyshire and chairman of Villa Edgewater body corp Alb Carlton at Cleveland Railway Station.

A controversial 124 apartment development at Cleveland Railway Station may get the nod from council after developers amended plans to include a cafe under a landmark eucalyptus.

The proposed multi-million dollar transit oriented building will provide a mix of residential and retail uses for residents and commuters including an improved car park, 124 residential units, a gymnasium, a business centre and a cafe.

The development has been in the pipeline for five years and residents have objected vehemently with some referring to it as the "bay horror zone."

"Our concerns of privacy and vehicle access to our complex will be compromised.

"There isn't enough commuter parking now, the kiss and ride zone is already busy between 3pm and 5pm, and we fear the development will have inadequate parking. The eight storey building, with balconies will be overlooking our complex," chairman of Villa Edgewater body corp Alb Carlton said.

He said he was disappointed that a development placed hard against the boundary of a residential low level complex, with insufficient residential, visitor and commuter parking could be approved without community consultation.

As this is a code assessable development application, public notification was not required during the application.

"We are not against development just bad development which will be with us for the next 100 years," Mr Carlton said.

The project - which is meant to help rejuvenate the Cleveland CBD - has been backed by the state government, although project details are up to the council.

The development application was granted preliminary approval at a council meeting in January 2017, providing the developer adjusted plans to save a eucalyptus tree at the front of the station and provide sufficient parking for units.

It stalled in March last year after the developers amended the plans to relocate its coffee shop to retain the eucalyptus tree. But the new location for the shop was on a different piece of land and required permission from the state government, as the land owner.

Consent from the Transport Department has been granted.

John Derbyshire and Alb Carlton under the landmark eucalyptus tree.

John Derbyshire and Alb Carlton under the landmark eucalyptus tree.

More stations have been earmarked for transit oriented developments including Coorparoo Junction and Ferny Grove.

Speaking on behalf of the developer, solicitor Jane Dillon from McCarthy Durie Lawyers said they would work with the company and council to ensure the project met planning laws.

"This is one of only five developments of its kind currently under way in Queensland, the Transport Orientated Development is designed to reduce the daily need for residents to use private motorised transport by providing practical, sustainable and well-designed residences in addition to ensuring improved commuter car parking facilities," she said.

Shore Street resident John Derbyshire said the appropriate land use should not be residential, but rather commercial or institutional.

"A lot more people will use the train and come into Cleveland. Even a TAFE would be suitable - easy access to transport and to bring students into the area. It's just not good planning," he said.

Mr Derbyshire said he was concerned the cafe would damage the landmark eucalyptus and questioned whether it would be successful.

Ground floor plan of the cafe.

Ground floor plan of the cafe.