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Cricket spotted in the snow at Namadgi National Park, Canberra

A mysterious cricket was filmed in the snow at Namadgi National Park

A mystery cricket looked extremely out of place as it crawled through the knee-high snow in Namadgi National Park recently.

Jordon Murray, 29, filmed the cricket as he descended Mount Gingera on Saturday, July 24.

In the video clip, the cricket tried to climb out of the snow track but fell on its back before getting up again.

"I was coming down the mountain, and at this point the snow was higher than my knees, when I spotted it (the cricket) from a couple metres away - it was glowing against the white snow," Mr Murray said.

"It was just walking in the middle of the fire trail, which was covered in snow, halfway down the back of the mountain.

"I assumed it got knocked by the wind or had tunnelled itself up from the snow."

A cricket looked extremely out of place as it braved the snow on Mount Gingera in Namadgi National Park on Saturday, July 24. Picture: Jordon Murray

A cricket looked extremely out of place as it braved the snow on Mount Gingera in Namadgi National Park on Saturday, July 24. Picture: Jordon Murray

Mr Murray, a beginner nature photographer, took some photos and videos of the cricket before leaving it in place and moving on.

"In the video I took, it looked like it was really cold, moving slow and when it fell, it drunkenly tried to get up again," he said.

"I stopped and watched it for a couple minutes. I didn't want to touch it or move it. This is Australia, I can't take the risk!

"I couldn't really move it since there was just nowhere but snow."

In a video, the cricket attempted to climb out of a path in the snow but fell back into the structure. Picture: Jordon Murray

In a video, the cricket attempted to climb out of a path in the snow but fell back into the structure. Picture: Jordon Murray

Unsure about what species of cricket he encountered, Mr Murray posted a picture and video to the Canberra Wildlife Photography Facebook Group.

Some wildlife enthusiasts suggested it was a Canberra raspy cricket (cooraboorama canberrae) but others argued it did not fit the description.

CSIRO cricket researcher Mr Youning Su confirmed it was not a Canberra raspy cricket, but rather another species from the same family.

"This is an adult female raspy cricket under the family gryllacrididae," Mr Su said.

"I cannot provide further ID since this group has not been well studied in Australia."

CSIRO cricket researcher Mr Youning Su said the insect was a female raspy cricket under the family Gryllacrididae. Picture: Jordon Murray

CSIRO cricket researcher Mr Youning Su said the insect was a female raspy cricket under the family Gryllacrididae. Picture: Jordon Murray

Gryllacrididae are a family of non-jumping insects known commonly as raspy crickets or leaf-rolling crickets found across the world.

Raspy crickets are mainly found in the southern hemisphere, with the greatest number and diversity in Australia, which has more than 120 different species.

They get their name from the "raspy" noise they make as a defence response to threats.

This story What is it? Mystery cricket species spotted in the snow at Namadgi first appeared on The Canberra Times.

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