COUNCIL

Employment, innovation, rural living part of Redland City Council plan for Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area

REDLAND City Council will prepare changes to the City Plan in a bid to prioritise economic activity and create employment in the Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area.

CHNAGES: Council voted to ammend the City Plan in a bid to prioritise economic activity and create employment in the Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area. Photo: Jordan Crick

CHNAGES: Council voted to ammend the City Plan in a bid to prioritise economic activity and create employment in the Southern Thornlands Potential Future Growth Area. Photo: Jordan Crick

Mayor Karen Williams said the council had taken on board community feedback, having voted last Wednesday to prepare a major amendment and advise the state government of the proposed changes.

Council's plans for the area include mixed industry and business, education, training and recreation, a transport precinct, storage and larger home-based industry activities.

"As part of our plans, land not used for economic uses should only be used for larger rural living blocks, reducing pressure on transport while protecting the area's relaxed rural lifestyle," Cr Williams said.

"Public consultation shows the community supports this plan with 80 per cent of the online respondents supporting council's proposal ...

"I don't think there is any place in the city that has been consulted or engaged in a planning process more than this area."

The Thornlands Future Growth Area has a complex planning history dating back to 2004, with the state government at one stage including part of the area in the urban footprint.

It left the land open to being subdivided for small-lot residential development, but that was later reversed. Instead, it was nominated as a Potential Future Growth Area, allowing the council to look at preferred uses.

Cr Adelia Berridge said it was questionable that 80 per cent of residents supported the plan, raising concerns about multiple submissions coming from the same person or household during public consultation.

A council report from May 2021 shows that, of the 190 public submissions made, 126 came from 26 households and 19 came from eight people.

"I was not comfortable with the public submissions that we accepted," Cr Berridge said.

"I don't know how you can say 80 per cent of people supported this ... when 75 per cent of submissions came from multiple households.

"It is something we should have had more time to discuss."

Cr Peter Mitchell said the residential aspect of the proposed amendment was important, but there should also be an emphasis on other uses.

"They are such a critical part of this planning exercise, too," he said.

"It is a wonderful opportunity for our city to help economic activity, retain our talent and stop people having to leave the city for work."

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